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and identify theft and hate crimes and civil rights issue and there's one thing that comes up in absolutely every conversation that i have had with people in the district, and that was bullying. and it really, it was, it's not surprising to the people in this room, i know. it was not surprising to me but it was troubling to me that in every community that i was meeting with, this was an issue prrp violence, harassment, physical, cyber, social, children on children, this kind of behavior is so disturbing and so troubling and so heartbreaking to so many people. even in this place, even in san francisco, california and northern california, which has got to be if not the most tolerant place in the country certainly amuck the most tolerance and diverse places in the community, this is what i was hearing out in the community and it's something we wanted to get involved in. and i'm so grateful that as a result of that all of you have agreed to come together to have a conversation about this issue with us included. i can't tell you how much we appreciate it. so thank you very much for being her
's civil rights defendants. if we simply wait for that train wreck to occur and prosecute, that's going to be like trying to cure cancer by building more hospitals. we can't do it that way. we've got to get into prevention mode. we've got to figure out strategies to prevent, we've got to empower school districts, we've got to empower parents, we've got to empower bystanders. when my daughter was bullied in 7th grade, her friends saw it, but they were paralyzed. they didn't know what to do and they did nothing. i don't begrudge thipl for that, they are wonderful kids, but they didn't have the tools to do anything about it. so we work on those issues and we work on those and our local school district was remarkable in their reaction. but in the work that we have done, ruslyn and i across the country, we have seen too many school districts, quite frankly, that have been slow to respond. and that is why we have to come together like this. that is why we have to get out of our lane and understand that we've got to make house calls. we've got to move beyond the traditional paradigm th
perez, assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. she was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. as i said, our moderator is n
summary of the laws. the ada, calif. building code, the civil rights, and our experts here will elaborate. we also have a list of certified caps at work in san francisco for you. carla johnson with the mayor's office of disability has created a really good it died of out to interview your experts to make sure you are getting the best quality product for you. been next -- the money you pay for the inspection you can take as a tax deduction. any money that if you have taken can be applied as a tax deduction. this can be done on an annual basis. next, the opportunity, and a fund -- opportunity loan fund, providing for small businesses to pay for the inspection or to make improvements needed. to do it before you receive the lawsuit. and lastly, we of the bar association and their resources. they're providing their legal service for you. this last thing i am going to share with you in terms of what we have seen in our office is that with the individuals, that does not necessarily mean an individual will follow up with a lawsuit. what we've seen in our office is the individual's will send you a
to that. and it is about state leadership, not just looking at the civil rights laws for protection, but -- and it certainly is our job to vigorously enforce them -- but it is your job as superintendent to (inaudible) even where the federal civil rights laws don't protect you. so it's a case of taking what you are doing, what folks are doing across the country and putting those on places like stopbullying dwofl .org so we can scale those up around the country. >> recognizable face. >> (inaudible) and i'm also head of the san francisco commission on women and the lieutenant governor asked about data. actually we do have data on bullying in san francisco high schools, particularly bullying among lgbt girls. so for the first time this year we've incorporated data that kevin coggin and ilsa (inaudible) provided and their suicide rates are off the charts, lesbian girls in our district. it's actually from the cdy youth risk survey. i want to offer that as a resource to folks in this room and encourage you in this pursuit of data. >> thank you. >> my question centers around the point o
involved in a lot of the civil rights activity. what was going on at spelman college at that time, and what did howard find himself in the middle of a lot of the civil rights politics? >> spelman college was in atlanta and even though it is seen today as one of the less racist spots in the south, in effect atlanta was almost totally segregated when howard arrived at spellman, but by the way, she made sure that people never thought that he took a job at an all black women's college because he was committed to the black struggle. but it was just beginning and to know how word did care about black rights he wasn't in activist on behalf of those rights. in fairly short order she and his wife both became very active the first white women came a little bit our after his arrival and even then a very few of them young black women many of whom had been part of the rural areas, they were slightly stunned at this white teacher and there were fewer other members of this bill my faculty. but howard was a genius of a teacher. she was very informal, very easygoing fox, he prided himself on a conversation
on who is taking part in the ceremony. a civil rights legacy lives on. stay with us. [ female announcer ] research suggests cell health plays a key role throughout our lives. one a day women's 50+ is a complete multivitamin designed for women's health concerns as we age. it has 7 antioxidants to support cell health. one a day 50+. >>> in less than two weeks, roberts will swear in president obama for his second term in office. as many as 800,000 visitors will be in washington for the inauguration. and crews are hard at work for the inaugural platform outside the capitol. it's a big day and the president set a big agenda to match it. he plans to tackle immigration, gun control, climate change, and tax reform in his second term. and with four years in office under his belt, this president knows what he wants and he's confident he'll get it. joining me now is democratic strategist margie omero and victoria defrancesco soto, a fellow at the university of texas and an msnbc contributor. thank you both for joining me tonight. >> thanks, rev. >> victoria, how does the president keep the momentu
to be where howard first got involved in civil rights activity. what was going on at spelman college at the time, and how did howard find himself in the middle of a lot of civil rights politics? >> guest: spelman college was in atlanta, and yet even though atlanta is seen certainly today as one of the less racist spots in the south, in fact, atlanta was almost totally segregated when howard arrived at pellman. by -- spelman. by the way, he never, he made sure that people never thought that he took a job at an all-black women's college because he was committed to the black struggle. we're talking about 1956 when the black struggle was just beginning. and though howard did care about black rights, he was not yet an activist in behalf of those rights. but in fairly short order, he and his wife roz both became very active. i mean, his students -- the first white women came a little bit after howard's arrival. and even then very few of them. and young black women, many of whom had been brought up in rural areas, they were slightly stunned at this white teacher. there were few other white
time in the most dramatic possible way. we had the chance conversations of the civil rights movement, and a life or death decisions be made during the cuban missile crisis. people often ask me why my father installed the system it as a lover of history i know he would've been drawn to this new technology as a way of keeping an accurate record of events for the memoir he planned to write after leaving office. and after the bay of pigs disaster, people say he wanted to be able to remember who said what in case they later changed their tune. [laughter] the wonderful thing about this book is that although much of this material has been available, it has not been easily accessible until now. the original recordings are of varying quality and it isn't always clear who is speaking in meetings. working with maura, our outstanding archivist and her colleagues here at the libra, historian ted widmer did an incredible job of selecting highlights from the most significant crises as well as excerpts to show the range and complexity of issues facing the president. as a citizen in an election seaso
rights, though that was part of it. for me harvey milk was about civil rights and the rights of all people and the recognition that we as minimum bier of the lgbt community are connected to other communities, and that we cannot be for lgbt rights if we're also not for the rights of other groups. that we cannot be -- (applause) >> -- only about the lgbt community. that if you believe in gay rights and lgbt rights, that you necessarily have to be for the rights of immigrants. that you necessarily have to be for the rights of women. that you necessarily have to be for the right for anyone who is disinfranchised in society. that to me is the essence of that legacy. * and why it's a legacy that transcends, transcends the lgbt community in terms whatv harvey milk was about. so, as an openly gay latino man, i am grateful for that legacy. and i am grateful that harvey milk, that george moscone, have become a beacon of light and hope not only for the lgbt community, but for so many communities throughout this country. and not just this country, but the world. and, so, that is what's so speci
with affirmative action, and at the time, as you may have read and not remember, the civil rights movement, martin luther king turned to full employment and poor people's campaign as the principal demand, and the johnson administration rather than coming up with full employment we spotted with affirmative action. you won't see look at the eyes on the prize or marching in the street demanding affirmative action. they were demanding full employment and trying to reach out to whites, latinos, asians, native americans, that was the vision. and she said when affirmative action happened, we knew it would only help the upper-middle-class within the black community, a very small percentage of african-americans, kids who want to go to these elite colleges, you know, that affirmative action was targeted or would benefit from. but we were scared of being read beaded and ostracized or attack so we backed down and just accepted that. he said we knew the poverty would remain in these basic issues of economic injustice would be made. i say this to say that movements can be the railed. they can be intimidated, th
. he also reminds us of our history. there has been no civil rights or human rights movement in which the faith communities and its leaders have not been at the forefront and i look at dr. and he is a living reminder of that truth. at the heart of civil rights movement in the years 1963 and 1964 before there was a san francisco interface council there was the san francisco conference on religion, race and social concerns which for 25 years was the voice of social justice in the city and county of san francisco. it was that movement that gave birth to the san francisco interfaith council whose mission it is to bring people together of different faiths, to celebrate our diverse spiritual and religious traditions, build understanding, and serve our city. it was a previous mayor that challenged the interface council to step up to the place, to respond to its moral responsibility to care for the homeless at a time of crisis spun out of control, and we did. for almost a quarter of a century we have opened our congregation doors, fed and provided a warm and safe place for homeless men to
that really limited the due process rights in civil commitments, and really look at it, contemplated it as an extension of the existing criminal sentence. and so, but it hasn't stopped the litigation but there is a lot of work that needs to be done still on civil commitment issues. and so it's kind of an ongoing project, and is in a host of different context, another talk by specific context, but this people, people civilly committed for mental because of mental illness. and there are a range of issues that the aclu has been working on with partner groups to actually address and raise the due process concerns about civil commitment. >> can you explain something about the philosophy behind incarceration, and why, what is the idea behind isolating a person so acutely? >> so, aside from the campaign to end overincarceration, the aclu likes of the campaigns, but another one is a campaign to stop the use of solitary or at least significantly curb its use. we've been very active the last several years litigating to prevent long-term isolation and to create benchmarks programs, access to se
, one that isn't based on a weapon. also, in the south i remember reading during the civil rights period where they were hosing people down with water and the water also had a lethal impact. so i am just saying that these weapons sound, well we are not using a gun or actual bullets. but it does not actually necessarily, i am not convinced that it necessarily always takes away the lethal aspect. and i think that we have plenty of examples where people of color and low income working people have particularly been victimized by that and there was even that incident here at the theatre where that young man was brandishing another little, i don't know, he was not brandishing a gun was killed. so, i'm just afraid that if then, the option comes to you as a taser that that is where the people will go automatically. instead of having like you said, the slow down, think more. whatever. i'm not, you know, and since tasers do have a lethal, there is a possibility of that and i'm just not... i just wish that the conversation were really different here. >> i agree, i don't disagree with what you are s
. >> michael myers, director of new york civil rights coalition to i wonder, commissioner, if you would comment, a change and progress and welfare reform policies. that no man in the home rule, -- [inaudible] because the mother and the children needed a system. so now in your current policy, you are encouraging -- [inaudible] what respect they change in social values? no more is there a father in the home. now families. so you can have a situation where you are defining parents of parenting and family such as depositing of head of the household. cycle that want you to talk about the requirements and context of mass unemployment. >> i will do both of those. first, i'm glad you raised the issue about father in the household. because the other way that we sort of try to tackle the single parent family issue is that we can see a little bit on marriage and say, well, let's work with the dead, with employment programs, programs that make enforcement program a little more forgiving and understanding so that we bring them into the system. we promote, we find parenting programs. so the idea is we can ge
of the piece, john cook, is not on the list. and action figures from "jango unchained" is from civil rights leaders and also al sharpton. and why is president obama nominating nothing but white males to the cabinet positions? the war on women continues straight ahead. greg? >> thanks, andy. >> you disgust me, greg. i was going to tell you why. >> why? >> it was only about maybe a month ago you were mocking me mercilessly for wearing a v neck sweater with a collar outside of it. >> really? >> yes. >> this is what happens when you leave your stuff at my place. >> you are just a little filth bucket. >> i am curious, you mentioned john cook. is that the john cook who lives in prospect heights? >> it might be. i'm not sure. jay in brooklyn -- >> in brooklyn? i think so. >> we can get his address. >> i don't know, maybe so. see you later, jerk. let's welcome my first guest. i am here are harris falkner, that's her name. and if hilarity were a gift card i would plow him at the olive garden. he is the co-host of the opie and anthony show. and in maine she considered a tackle box. it is bill schulz.
right decides to make an argument that is insane, they jump on the civil rights movement or slavery and try to latch their argument onto the history -- >> yes. >> as if they give a damn. as if they would have been up at the front for the fight. >> exactly. >> you don't remember ted nugent standing in front of everyone m the civil rights marches. >> i remember him refusing to go to vietnam. i remember him getting out of going to vietnam and being afraid to carry a gun when his country asked him to carry a gun. he was a coward. these guys always jump on slavery and the civil rights movement. ths offensive. if slaves hadn't been owned by other people there wouldn't have been slavery either. >> this is what's happening now is something we've been talking about for five years. that is the extreme right, let's call it what it is, has gone on about barack obama as a socialist, as -- conspiracy theories about secret plans to take guns and dominate the country, and now because biden comes out and talks about high-capacity magazines they say finally, we finally have something -- >> nailed the
to be the civil rights case -- civil rights issue term, more so than in many past decades. >> pete, you mentioned the voting rights act there. specifically this deals with section 5, the preclearance provision. >> right. >> i have picking up from supporters of preclearance, i'm picking up on an awful lot of sort of negativity in terms of how they think this is disappearing to go. i guess roberts a couple years ago basically made a comment that things have changed in the south. >> exactly. >> we don't want to get too far ahead of ourselves, but if the court does toss section 5, what would be the larger impact on the entire voting rights act if that were to happen? >> the civil rights advocates would tell you section 5 is the real teeth. this is the thing that requires states to justify their changes in advance. the other part of the law would remain intact. that's the part of the law that allows anybody to sue a state if they believe it engages in racial discrimination at the polls. but civil rights advocates would say this just invites a game of whack a mole. that every time something pops up, th
and thank you even for being your civil rights attorney and you are still representing people in need and i appreciate that. i know angela represents again the kind of contributions the italian community has made to our great city and continues to make and i am here to tonight to wish you a great year of italian culture but to kick start it. it was really just a few months ago that the ambassador ofity italy came through and talk about this wonderful thing they were to do to celebrate year of italian culture but transfer that to our country of the united states so i know they're going to start those events in washington dc with their celebrations but let us san francisco celebrate -- mayor aleato and our wonderful history here and allow us to do a preliminary launch and so that's what we're attempting to do tonight and celebrate with you this launch of italian culture. it's very meaningful for us to did that year. we have a lot to celebrate. let me just say that painters, scrptdures, poets, musicians, designers, mathematicians, great architects of the italian country have come here to sa
in the 1700's which nobody would have ever predicted would end slavery 100 years later. the civil rights movement ups and downs. i think that it is important to always know that social movements are not simple narrative of arcs of one of success after another. it is not about occupying space. it is about confronting the enormous challenges we face in america and the globe. if we do not confront of these changes, we will not have a future. one way of thinking about maybe the history of the abs and a -- ebbs and flows of social movement is to say -- for those who write the demise of this movement, which there is always a gap or you can have hope. that is the importance of the beginning of the occupy movement. it actually is a source of hope that people responded to the changes in this country that really show that there are cracks that can be exploited. and i will stop. thank you. >> ok. >> nadine. >> she actually took my answer. [laughter] that's what i was going to say. so, there is some good overlap. i guess i will talk a bit about my experience with occupy and start off with a general
point to point as we were advised by my iconic hero, a civil-rights hero, first assessments of rice division. he was to have as much freedom as any other student. well, yes. but at the same time there are deer hunters, and it was the season, and we were constantly aware of who might come upon to the campus. did not look like a student, had been to mine in a deer rifle and we had to be constantly aware of that kind of threat to his life. a brave person. i was sitting in his dormitory room the first couple of days reading the hate mail, the death threats. a very detailed. we know where you live, or your parents are. or going to kill you, your tolerance. and i looked at janzen said to have you read this one. he looked back and said the limelight from a spanish class. let's go. that can the bridge every state with him in that kind of courage stayed with him throughout my association with him. he never crack troubling to. the students plan to. i should say that 99 percent of the student body went about their weight inning and education. they cared little about him being on the campus. to
which nobody would have ever predicted would end slavery 100 years later. the civil rights movement sought ups and downs. i think that it is important to always know that social movements are not simple narrative of parks of one of success after another. -- arcs of success after another. it is not about occupying space. it is about confronting the enormous challenges we face in america and the globe. if we do not confront of these changes, we will not have a future. one way of thinking about maybe the history of the abs and a flows of social movement is to say -- for those who write the demise of this movement, which there is is always a gap or you can have hope. that is the importance of the beginning of the occupy movement. it actually is a source of hope that people responded to the changes in this country that really show that there are cracks that can be exploited. and i will stop. thank you. >> ok. >> she actually took my answer. [laughter] that's what i was going to say. so, there is some good overlap. i guess i will talk a bit about my experience with occupy and start off wi
says his civil rights have been violated. >> you know, from what i've learned, hour they're treating me seasoned my dog is not fair. i think charlie deserves another chance. >> a new conference scheduled for 1:30 this afternoon where charlie's owner says he will make a fair and reasonable proposal to the city. >>> new this morning, an update to a story we have been following in the east bay. the oakland zoo says the alligator that was found just yesterday guarding a stash of pot inside a castro valley home has died. alameda county sheriff's deputies found the gator named mr. teeth when doing a routine probation check. it was in a tank, apparently guarding 34 pounds of dried marijuana. the gator was taken to the oakland zoo where it was placed in quarantine after its owner said it was very sick. that owner is now in jail. >>> some relief for a hayward mother whose daughter was kidnapped in 1998 and never seen again. a bone fragment found in a well in linden does not match michaele garecht's dna. the well is believed to be a dumping ground for the so-called speed freak killers. in a blog
of the civil rights movement and the birm birmingham children's mar pch which broke the back of the birmingham massive resistance against civil rights when you started to see the teenagers and the young people and you realized, oh, wait a minute the injustices to youth and families helps to galvanize the american consciousness, but as you pointed out, the biggest piece of it was showing a pathway to the administration legally of what to do, and when you look at the new action that the president and the administration have taken around families that will take effect in march, and what is after that? if we have younger family members addressed and some families addressed, it seems a lot of hole, and so how does the movement embodied by la raza start to move forward? >> well, obviously, we want to continue to move for the comprehensive immigration reform and have a law passed to deal with this in a permanent way. and the president's action while important step to provide relief to the young people, the dreamer, it is not permanent. we do need comprehensive immigration reform. and we are looking a
to everyone in prison and preserve the civil rights. thirdly, to work to reestablish the infrastructure and compensate people who have suffered damages. >> we're joined in the studio but a number of the syrian national coalition. that is his first speech in months. >> i heard in the rhetoric -- i heard empty rhetoric. he spent the first part of the speech saying there are no partners for a critical solution. then he offered a political solution that called for crushing the opposition so he could have a free hand in controlling the country. he did not operate -- he did not offer to step down. that has to be there to start negotiations. listening to him, he talked about syria and equated syria with himself. defending syria is equal to defending himself and his control. it shows us is a dictator that cannot be negotiated with. ultimately, it will be a win and lose situation. >> he says he is looking for partners witwhom to discuss a way out of the conflict. who do you think he considers appropriate? >> he does not consider anyone appropriate. he did not recognize the opposition. he said th
's support of african american entrepreneurship, civil rights and political involvement began before 1958 when he took ownership of the bar and remained constant until his death in 2003. his influence extended far beyond the neighborhood to include the larger sphere of san francisco. in 1963, jordan became the first african american to campaign for mayor of san francisco, running on a progressive platform of social justice and racial equality. the bar was a centerpiece of jordan's neighborhood community building activities and he reviedd in the upstairs unit for nearly 50 years. jordan was known locally as the mayor of butcher town, which was the historic name for the area immediately surrounding the bar. his efforts to establish a place of community and legacy within the bayview area continues for which he is known to this day. the bar continues to be operated by the jordan family, who are here today, who support the land mark designation. this concludes my presentation, if you have any questions. >> thank you. supervisor cohen? >> i think that's it. >> let's open this up for publi
better to look at your property today, have it inspected, and make the changes because this is a civil rights statute. it is the same thing as discrimination based on race, and it is treated the same way in the courts. >> i heard the previous speaker make some good points about be a pro are the -- proactive about getting a task inspector before you get sued. i am f. task inspector. if you have to cut -- heard the term thrown around, inspection created by our state senators, and it is really great information out there that i want to encourage everyone. i will not be able to go into extensive details, but i will be able to tell you a little bit of what is involved. the difference is in the california building code. i can also give you tips on how to choose and specter appeared first of all, the program has an inspector's knowledge of the california building code, and the reason why that is so important is because you have to comply with both. the california billing code is enforced when you get a building permit, and forced by the local building requirements. it says all new buildings h
or the depression or vietnam or civil rights movement, or perhaps if your parents or grandparents came from another country and settled here what it's like. only five to ten percent of the ands come up. if i asked that same question in afghanistan or pakistan or africa 90% of ands come up and i think the as great tragedy we've lost that oral tradition and a rich tradition about folklore and heritage and faith and heritage. to honor that today i'd like to share with you a little story. it's a hard cover book that came out in march of 2006. anybody have a hard cover. wave it up here. you might not want it after i say this. i got to pick the title. three cups of tea but viking told me they would pick the subtitle and they picked one man mission to fight terrorism one school at a time. i objected because obviously there's- ways to fight tear riz m with education but i said i do this to promote peace and i started 8 years before 911 and this is about promoting peace through education. i've worked afghanistan and pakistan many years and i said we need to have a tribal council. i went to manhattan in the
unemployment rate. this under a president who is -- has set a renewed commitment to civil rights, the justice department civil rights commission, and still this unemployment rate is a disastrous highs. imagine a republican in office staying down the barrel of a -- >> neil: we know that 7.8% isn't great and a jobless claims report like the one we got is hardly anything to whoop about. but i think it's a double ininto itment when the media glosses over that. and i don't kerr it's a democrat or republican in os. office. we didn't gloss over bad numbers or foolhardy -- when president bush was in office. what is good for the goose better be good for the began depth depressant see it from media's portrayal of what is at best a bumpy recovery. >> there are plenty of outrages that get ignored by the press in every administration because the press, above all, is shallow and dumb. so they just miss certain things. the effect of certain programs. but the unemployment rate is pretty easy extra track and we know what it was 50 years ago, and we can look through the continuum and know that by historyical s
starting point is where people are. it may be that labor is a spent force and that civil-rights organizations are spent forces and the community-based organizations are narrow minded and too anxious to just get a foundation grant for government low-income tax credit to build five units of housing and it will not change the system, but that is where people are. for the last four years i have been working with the building insurance, the widest part of the labor movement. i have been working with them to try and get a young black and latino kids of color into the building trade so that they can become the green work force of the future. the building trade, conservative as they are, operates 1200 job training centers in the construction trade and is the second-largest mechanism outside the navy. guess what? they are actually in a coalition with youth bills, with many other organizations that train high-school dropouts, inner-city kids, working together for the last four years to say -- how do we change and improve? the national leadership of the building trade has gone across 350 c
or the anti-gun control movement -- >> the civil rights movement -- >> the civil rights movement. >> the suffragette movement, women's rights, you've got to be organized. >> absolutely. you've got to be organized. and what we see, remember that 16% i identified as the alarmed? again people who are very concerned and think this is an urgent problem, but they feel relatively isolated and alone. they say, "i feel this way, some of my friends and family feel this strongly." but they have no sense that they're part of over 40 million americans that feel just as strongly as they do. they've never been properly organized, mobilized and directed to demand change. and i mean, that's what the political system ultimately responds to. if you basically have a vacuum of people who are demanding change, and i don't mean that truly. i mean, there are of course many great organizations that have been advocating for change for a long time. but it hasn't been a broad based citizens movement demanding change. in that situation a relatively small but well-funded and vocal community that says no can a
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 232 (some duplicates have been removed)